//]]>
Created on: Sunday,March 16 8:07 AM
Last modified: Sunday,March 16 8:07 AM

David Brenner dies of cancer

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Other veteran comics could head straight to “The Tonight Show” couch to banter with Johnny Carson, but David Brenner had to do a stand-up routine when he was a guest.

Finally, Carson told a puzzled Brenner why.

“I like to sit back, smoke a cigarette and laugh for six minutes,” Brenner, in a 2013 interview with CBS, recalled him saying.

Carson’s regard for Brenner, who died in his New York City home Saturday at age 78 after battling cancer, made him one of the most frequent visitors to “Tonight” as a guest and substitute host who was on more than 150 times.

And NBC’s late-night show, in return, made Brenner’s career.

It made the former documentary filmmaker into a hot comedian, one who was ubiquitous on other talk shows and game shows.

The lanky, always sharply dressed Brenner also briefly hosted his own syndicated talk show in 1987 and starred in four HBO specials.

Brenner moved with the times, trading routines about the humor of everyday life for jokes about social and political issues, and appearing on MSNBC and Fox News Channel cable programs.

Although his career faltered, he worked steadily through 2013 doing standup. A four-day gig last December included a New Year’s Eve show at a Pennsylvania casino-resort in which he showcased young comedians.

Brenner, who was raised in working-class south Philadelphia and graduated with honors from Temple University, was “always there helping a bright young comedian, whether it be Richard Lewis, Freddie Prinze or Jimmie Walker, and he was still doing it until the very end,” said his friend and publicist, Jeff Abraham.

In a statement, Walker called Brenner “a true comic genius” who was “my mentor and taught me about life and comedy.”

The lanky, toothy-grinned Brenner’s brand of observational comedy became a staple for other standups, including Jerry Seinfeld and Paul Reiser.

“David Brenner was a huge star when I met him and he took me under his wing. To me, historically, he was the godfather of hip, observational comedy,” comedian Richard Lewis said in a statement. “He mentored me from day one. ... His passing leaves a hole in my life that can never be replaced.”

Brenner’s take on his career, as he described it in a 2000 interview with The Associated Press, was that he put family before stardom.

“In a nutshell, I couldn’t work more than 50 nights a year (out of town) or I’d be an absentee father,” he said. “That was when they were giving out the talk shows, the sitcoms.”

He was asked if he regretted his decision.

“I didn’t even make a decision. I didn’t even think about it. How could you not do it? I don’t mean to sound noble,” Brenner said. “Besides, I come from the slums of Philadelphia and everything in my life is profit. My downside is what most people would strive a lifetime to get to.”

Funeral plans were not immediately announced.

Bookmark this page to:Add to Twitter Add to Yahoo Bookmarks Add to Facebook Add to LinkedIn Add to Google Bookmarks Add to StumbleUpon Add to Digg Add to Reddit Add to Delicious

 

  TheDPost.com 

  Copyright 2014

  All rights reserved.

  This material may not be broadcast or distributed, rewritten or published without explicit
  permission from The West Virginia Newspaper Publishing Co.


  • image
    AP
    FILE - This July 13, 1977 file photo shows comedian David Brenner. On Saturday, March 15, 2014, publicist Jeff Abraham announced Brenner has died at the age of 78. (AP Photo)
TheDPost.com Comment Policy
  TheDPost.com encourages readers to engage in conversations about site content. If you would like to comment, please abide by the follow guidelines:
·     Stay on topic: Do not include comments about other subjects.
·     Be civil: Challenge opinions but don’t personally attack or degrade others. No use of all-caps, bold or italics.
·     Watch your language and image: No vulgarity, obscene or profane photos or language (actual or implied), including intentionally misspelling words, using characters or dashes.
·     No frauds: Do not use the identity of a company or another person (living or dead).
·     No free ads: Do not use comments to promote a business, money-making endeavor or individual promotion.
·     Link limit: It is not permitted to excessively link to external sites.
  TheDPost.com reserves the right to remove any comment deemed unacceptable or that fails to meet our commenting guidelines. The DPost.com also reserves the right to suspend or revoke commenting privileges should a user violate the commenting guidelines. A suspension or revocation of privileges could affect the commenting privileges of others in your household.
  TheDPost.com takes seriously any attempts to threaten, harass or intimidate readers and employees, and will report such behavior to authorities.



Leave message
Your rating:



 
 Security code